Reimagining Harvard’s Home for World Religion

If a place could be said to house the soul of Harvard Divinity School, it would be Andover Hall.

A multiuse building located in the middle of the HDS campus, Andover’s classrooms, meeting rooms, worship spaces, and resources both house and enrich the School’s vibrant intellectual and spiritual life.

HDS has launched a $60 million fundraising effort to support the comprehensive revitalization of Andover Hall, which includes a $30 million naming opportunity. When complete, the renewed space will transform the ways that the people of Harvard Divinity School engage the world and each other. The project’s highlights include:

Andover Hall campus center

Creation of a true campus center that brings Andover Library and the School’s core academic resources together with student services and social space.

Lecture hall in Andover Hall

New space for public conversations on religion with leaders like Jimmy Carter, Toni Morrison, the Dalai Lama, and scholars throughout academia.

Andover Hall classroom

Modernized classrooms ideally suited to new ways of teaching and learning, with flexible spaces and a new multimedia infrastructure.

Andover Chapel

A multifaith chapel where Christians, Jews, Muslims, Buddhists, Hindus, and all members of HDS community may gather to worship, perform, and share experiences.

Beyond sustainability: The promise of net-zero

Now there is also the prospect of transforming the heart of the HDS campus into a net-zero energy consumer: a building where the energy created from onsite renewable sources each year is equal to the amount of energy consumed. This option has the potential to address, for the first time, issues faced by historic structures throughout Harvard University and beyond. These include:

  • Solutions to design constraints. Net-zero projects are typically new construction. Lessons learned from Andover’s renewal will provide a model for the retrofit of the roughly 700 existing buildings on Harvard’s campus—and for organizations and communities looking to go “carbon free” in the years ahead;
  • Overcoming a challenging climate. Andover’s renewal will provide a model for efficient heating, ventilation, and air conditioning in the often extreme New England weather;
  • Managing intensive energy use. The net-zero project will include administrative, classroom, conference, and social spaces to demonstrate efficient lighting and heating in areas that have a higher than usual energy density;
  • Green building in an urban environment. Almost all existing net-zero buildings are located in suburban or more rural areas where land for solar panels or wind turbines is more plentiful. This project will advance urban design for net-zero energy.

Andover Hall cross-section

As HDS looks to its third century, the renewal of Andover Hall will ensure that the building lives up to its potential as the center of the School’s effort to empower scholars and leaders for a religiously complex world. View the case for net-zero.

Our students deserve a modern, dynamic space for learning. Future students will expect it. As HDS looks to its third century, we aim to ensure that this vital and distinctive building lives up to its potential as the center of the School’s effort to empower scholars and leaders for a religiously complex world.

Please email campaign@hds.harvard.edu for more information about the Campaign for HDS.