Community Life

Students after 2011 Convocation

A distinguishing feature of Harvard Divinity School is the vibrancy of our community life, and our greatest asset is our people. To maximize the benefit of the diversity and richness of experience of those who are part of HDS, life inside and outside the classroom is intentionally designed to promote conversation and connection among the wonderful people in this community.

One of the traditions at HDS for over 30 years is our Community Tea. Hosted by the Office of Student Life on most Tuesdays during the fall and spring terms from 4 to 5:30 pm in the Braun Room, Community Tea offers a chance for students, faculty, and staff to engage in informal conversation over beverages and food. It is a time to relax, refuel, and reconnect with the community.

Informal encounters over lunch in the Rockefeller Café, impromptu Frisbee on the HDS campus green, study sessions in the library, Town Hall meetings, the annual Theological Revue, ice cream socials, meditation and worship and the sharing of spiritual practices—all of these provide opportunities for learning outside the classroom and for building intellectual and social connections among all members of the HDS community.

Of course, in addition to our traditions, our talented students bring lively new spirit each year. Members of the HDS community have expressed their talents in such venues as poetry readings, gospel concerts, film, artwork, journalism, and original plays. The wide array of events sponsored by the University—such as museum exhibits, film showings, athletic competitions, concerts, and theatrical performances—add important depth to the Harvard educational experience.

HDS Voices

Francis X. Clooney, S. J.
All of us share the challenge of moving from the very particular disciplines the academy and our religious traditions have taught us to the less certain postmodern places where particularity can again be more evident and potent, destabilizing our comfortable ways and making us think. But we need to enter upon this more general conversation without losing sight of the details and energy of profession and tradition that guided our research in the first place.
—Francis X. Clooney, S.J., Parkman Professor of Divinity and Professor of Comparative Theology; Director of the Center for the Study of World Religions