Community Life

Students after 2011 Convocation

A distinguishing feature of Harvard Divinity School is the vibrancy of our community life, and our greatest asset is our people. To maximize the benefit of the diversity and richness of experience of those who are part of HDS, life inside and outside the classroom is intentionally designed to promote conversation and connection among the wonderful people in this community.

One of the traditions at HDS for over 30 years is our Community Tea. Hosted by the Office of Student Life on most Tuesdays during the fall and spring terms from 4 to 5:30 pm in the Braun Room, Community Tea offers a chance for students, faculty, and staff to engage in informal conversation over beverages and food. It is a time to relax, refuel, and reconnect with the community.

Informal encounters over lunch in the Rockefeller Café, impromptu Frisbee on the HDS campus green, study sessions in the library, Town Hall meetings, the annual Theological Revue, ice cream socials, meditation and worship and the sharing of spiritual practices—all of these provide opportunities for learning outside the classroom and for building intellectual and social connections among all members of the HDS community.

Of course, in addition to our traditions, our talented students bring lively new spirit each year. Members of the HDS community have expressed their talents in such venues as poetry readings, gospel concerts, film, artwork, journalism, and original plays. The wide array of events sponsored by the University—such as museum exhibits, film showings, athletic competitions, concerts, and theatrical performances—add important depth to the Harvard educational experience.

HDS Voices

William Graham

William A. Graham

I envision a place where interfaith and cross-cultural understanding is always on a personal level and comes naturally rather than being an objective. By working on shared problems in the history and practice of religions, shoulder to shoulder with persons of different faiths, cultures, races, ethnicities, and viewpoints, one discovers most tangibly the common humanity shared with others very different from oneself.
—William A. Graham, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor and Member of the Faculty of Divinity