Religion and Politics

A Bible in front of a gray American flag

The Uproar Over the 'Ultimate American Bible'

September 16, 2021
“Putting the Bible or placing American history within the Bible, or suggesting the U.S. is a source of revelation, is seen by many evangelicals as a kind of heresy,” said HDS Professor Catherine Brekus.
Professor Jocelyne Cesari

From 9/11 to COVID-19: Lessons Learned on Religion and Politics

September 8, 2021
"Religion is conceived very narrowly with exclusive attention to ideas or doctrines, even though we have established that most of the political conflicts related to religion do not pertain to beliefs but belongings," writes Jocelyne Cesari, Dermot T. J. Dunphy Visiting Professor of Religion, Violence, and Peacebuilding at HDS.
A soldier stands guard at Kandahar Air Base in Afghanistan on December 8, 2013. REUTERS/Mark Wilson/Pool.  THOUGH NONVIOLEN

Could the U.S. Government Take Nonviolence Seriously?

September 3, 2021
“Baked into the international system and into diplomacy, especially in the West, is a great deal of simplistic and often biased thinking about religion,” said Susan Hayward, associate director of the religious literacy and the professions initiative at HDS.
Terry Tempest Williams

Terry Tempest Williams: We Have to Bridge Our Divides

April 13, 2021
"Healing this uncivil war, especially within our own families, is not about changing our minds or even our hearts but first creating a space where we can meet unarmed. Here, an opening can occur. We are not abandoning our principles, but expanding our points of view," says HDS writer-in-residence Terry Tempest Williams.
Judaism, Christianity and Islam are represented with Jewish Star, Cross and Crescent. Photo by Getty Images

Radicalization and Religion: How It Happens?

March 4, 2021

"People are not more fervent believers than they used to be, but their identification to religion has certainly shifted, creating a conjunction of religious and political identities that facilitate political mobilization and sometimes radical actions," writes T. J. Dermot Dunphy Visiting Professor of Religion, Violence, and Peacebuilding Jocelyne Cesari.

Quardricos Driskell, MTS '08

Podcast: What Black History Month in 2021 Means for a Rising Spiritual and Ethical Movement

February 12, 2021

In February of 1926, Carter G. Woodson, a Harvard-education historian, had a very specific goal in mind when he established what was then called Negro History Week. He hoped, as time went along, that Black history would be recognized as so entrenched in American history that calendars wouldn’t indicate when society should celebrate Black history.

Flash forward to 1970, when Black History Month as we know it today was first celebrated at Kent State University, then 16 years later, in 1986, when the U.S. Congress officially recognized Black History Month as the law of the land,...

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