Christianity

Quardricos Driskell, MTS '08

What Black History Month in 2021 Means for a Rising Spiritual and Ethical Movement

February 12, 2021

In February of 1926, Carter G. Woodson, a Harvard-education historian, had a very specific goal in mind when he established what was then called Negro History Week. He hoped, as time went along, that Black history would be recognized as so entrenched in American history that calendars wouldn’t indicate when society should celebrate Black history.

Flash forward to 1970, when Black History Month as we know it today was first celebrated at Kent State University, then 16 years later, in 1986, when the U.S. Congress officially recognized Black History Month as the law of the land,...

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Professor Charles Stang

Charles Stang on Twinship in Christian Texts

February 10, 2021
"For me, the evidence of Judas Thomas the Twin of Jesus in early Christianity points to a much larger pattern in ancient religion that I call the 'divine double,' by which I mean a belief that every person has a divine counterpart, twin, or alter-ego. To encounter one’s divine double is to embark on a path of deification, becoming divine or even a god,” says Professor Charles Stang, director of the Center for the Study of World Religions.
Joe Biden was inaugurated as the 46th President of the United States on January 20, 2021. / Photo: Creative Commons, Gage Skidmore

How Joe Biden’s Faith Will Shape His Presidency

January 19, 2021

In an October 2020 op-ed for the Christian Post, Joe Biden wrote: “My Catholic faith drilled into me a core truth—that every person on earth is equal in rights and dignity, because we are all beloved children of God.” As president, he continued, “These are the principles that will shape all that I do, and my faith will continue to serve as my anchor, as it has my entire life.”... Read more about How Joe Biden’s Faith Will Shape His Presidency

Wilson Hood, MDiv '19

What Really Matters

November 30, 2020
"Our lives are so fragile. They always have been. We are always living on the brink, on the edge, at the threshold. Every single day carries the possibility of our last judgment. Every breath is a prelude to the apocalypse. As the philosopher and mystic Simone Weil once wrote: 'Human existence is so fragile a thing and exposed to such dangers that I cannot love without trembling,'" says Wilson Hood, MDiv '19.
Giovanni Bazzana is Professor of New Testament at HDS.

Apocalypse Now

November 9, 2020

Bazzana uncovers the truth about the book of Revelation in early Christianity—and today

Coronavirus. Unemployment. Social unrest. People often describe the times we’re living in as “apocalyptic,” but Giovanni Bazzana wouldn’t necessarily agree.... Read more about Apocalypse Now

Jesus and Disciples Carrying Crosses

The Cost of Discipleship

August 31, 2020
"Dietrich Bonhoeffer reminds us that the world desperately needs honest followers of Christ who speak truth to power, risk their necks to help those in trouble, refuse to play it safe when fundamental human values have been scorned and pushed aside, when hatred seeks to stifle love," writes Professor Frank Clooney.
Does the New Testament Support Christian Zionism?

Does the New Testament Support Christian Zionism?

July 21, 2020

"Seeking a basis for reconciliation between Jews and Christians has been a much-pursued enterprise over the past few centuries. For the most part, the quest has been founded upon a mutual willingness to dilute religious conviction or bracket it altogether," writes Professor Jon D. Levenson.

Professor Frank Clooney

Yearning for God in a World of Troubles

July 21, 2020
"The larger the problems are around us, the deeper we must go if we are to be spiritually alive, able to manifest God’s healing power in a world that seems anything but holy," writes Professor Francis X. Clooney, S.J.

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