Courses Offered in the SLP

UPDATE: August 4, 2020

Thank you for your interest in the HDS Summer Language Program 2020. We hope to see you again in the coming years!

Please note that all SLP language courses are also offered at HDS during the academic year (regular fall and spring semesters), and we look forward to seeing you there as well.


Course schedule overview (SLP 2020)

The course schedule for the SLP 2021 will be available in March of 2021.

Course title Instructor Teaching Fellow Course times for SLP 2020
Christian Latin  Craig Tichelkamp Norman Sheidlower MWTh, 12:30–3:30 pm (EDT)
Classical Arabic  Haci Osman Gündüz Norman Sheidlower MTTh, 9 am–12 pm (EDT)
  Mandatory Tutoring Sessions Norman Sheidlower W, 9 am–12 pm (EDT)
Elementary Biblical Hebrew  Vivian L. Johnson Allison Hurst MWTh, 4–7 pm (EDT)
Elementary New Testament Greek  James C. Skedros Sara Griffis MWTh, 12:30–3:30 pm (EDT)
Elementary Pali  Beatrice Chrystall Alexis Bader Brown MTTh, 12:30–3:30 pm (EDT)
Intermediate Biblical Hebrew  Jonathan Mason-Wolfe Allison Hurst MWTh, 4–7 pm (EDT)
Intermediate New Testament Greek  Judy Haley Sara Griffis MWTh, 4–7 pm (EDT)
Theological French Pascale Torracinta Tali Zechory MWTh, 4–7 pm (EDT)
Theological German  Karin Grundler-Whitacre Morgan Curtis MWTh, 4–7 pm (EDT)
Theological Spanish  Eileen Mary O’Connor Lana Jaffe Neufeld MWTh, 4–7 pm (EDT)
Elementary Syriac (the next SLP Elementary Syriac will be offered during the SLP 2023)  TBD TBD TBD

2020 full course information

Updated course information will be available in March 2021. Below is course information for classes taught during the SLP 2020.

Christian Latin 

Instructor: Craig Tichelkamp
Schedule: Monday 12:30–3:30 pm | Wednesday 12:30–3:30 pm | Thursday 12:30–3:30 pm
Room Assignment: Online
Teaching Fellow: Norman Sheidlower (email)

This course offers an intensive foundation for reading Latin. It combines a study of grammar with exercises, readings, and vocabulary from theological and religious studies. Students read from such sources as the Latin Bible, Cicero, and Augustine (in medieval manuscripts and early modern books at the Andover-Harvard Theological Library's Special Collections). Students will leave with the ability to read and translate intermediate Latin texts with the aid of a lexicon.

Required books

  • Keller, Andrew and Stephanie Russell, Learn to Read Latin, 2nd ed., New Haven: Yale University Press, 2015.
  • Keller, Andrew and Stephanie Russell, Learn to Read Latin (Workbook Part 1), New Haven: Yale University Press, 2015.
  • Keller, Andrew and Stephanie Russell, Learn to Read Latin (Workbook Part 2), New Haven: Yale University Press, 2015.

Suggested book:

  • Collins, John F. A Primer of Ecclesiastical Latin, Washington, D.C.: Catholic University of America, 1988.

Classical Arabic 

Instructor: Haci Osman Gündüz
Schedule:
Course 1: Monday, 9 am–12:00 pm | Tuesday, 9 am–12 pm| Thursday, 9 am–12:00 pm
Course 2: Monday, 12:30–3:30 pm | Tuesday, 12:30–3:30 pm | Thursday, 12:30–3:30 pm
Mandatory Section (with Teaching Fellow):
Course 1: Wednesday, 9 am–12 pm
Course 2: Wednesday, 12:30–3:30 pm
Room Assignment: Online
Teaching Fellow: Norman Sheidlower (email)

The purpose of this course is to develop students’ ability to read and understand classical Arabic texts through in-class translation, grammar exercises, and discussion of culture-specific concepts. By the end of the course, students can expect to have acquired a solid knowledge of Arabic syntax and morphology, a richer vocabulary, and the skills required for close reading of advanced classical Arabic texts in a variety of genres. The prerequisite is one year of Modern Standard Arabic.

Required books

  • Thackston, W. M. An Introduction to Koranic and Classical Arabic. Bethesda, MD: IBEX Publishers, 2000.

Elementary Biblical Hebrew

Instructor: Vivian L. Johnson
Schedule: Monday 4–7 pm | Wednesday 4–7 pm | Thursday 4–7 pm
Room Assignment: Online
Teaching Fellow: Allison Hurst (email)

This course offers an intensive introduction to grammar and syntax and presupposes no previous knowledge of the language. We will begin with Hackett’s Introduction and additional exercises; by the end of the term we will be translating directly from the Hebrew Bible.

Required book:

Elementary New Testament Greek 

Instructor: James C. Skedros
Schedule: Monday 12:30–3:30 pm | Wednesday 12:30–3:30 pm | Thursday 12:30–3:30 pm
Room Assignment: Online
Teaching Fellow: Sarah Griffis (email)

This is a course on the grammar and vocabulary of the Greek New Testament. It is the equivalent of a one-year introductory course in New Testament Greek. In addition, students will be introduced to a substantial amount of classical Greek grammar, syntax, and selected vocabulary.

Required books

  • Croy, N. Clayton. A Primer of Biblical Greek. Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans, 1999.
    ISBN-10: 0802860001
    ISBN-13: 9780802860002
  • Hansen, Hardy, and Gerald Quinn. Greek. An Intensive Course. 2nd rev. ed. New York: Fordham University Press, 1992.
    ISBN-10: 0823216632
    ISBN-13: 978-0823216635
  • Liddell, H. G., and R. Scott. An Intermediate Greek-English Lexicon. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    ISBN-10: 0199102066
    ISBN-13: 9780199102068

At least One Greek New Testament (such as):

  • Aland, Kurt, and Eberhard Nestle. Novum Testamentum Graece. With Dictionary 27th ed. Stuttgart: Deutsche Bibelgesellschaft, 2005.
    ISBN-10: 159856174X
    ISBN-13: 978-1598561746
  • Aland, Kurt, et. al. eds. The Greek New Testament. With Dictionary 4th rev. ed. New York: American Bible Society, 1998.
    ISBN-10: 3438051133
    ISBN-13: 978-3438051134
  • Aland, Kurt and Eberhard Nestle. Novum Testamentum Graece. 27th ed. New York: American Bible Society, 1993.
    ISBN-10: 34380510001
    ISBN-13: 978-3438051004

Recommended lexicon:

  • Bauer, Walter. Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament and Other Early Christian Literature. Revised and edited by Frederick William Danker. 3rd ed. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 2000.
    ISBN-10: 0226039331
    ISBN-13: 978-0226039336

Elementary Pali

Instructor: Beatrice Chrystall
Schedule: Monday 12:30–3:30 pm | Tuesday 12:30–3:30 pm | Thursday 12:30–3:30 pm
Room Assignment: Online
Teaching Fellow: Alexis Bader Brown (email)

Pali is the language of the Buddhist canon of the Theravāda tradition of Sri Lanka, India and Southeast Asia—one of the most important canons in the Buddhist world. As such, it has had a central place in modern Buddhist Studies. Studying Pali is useful for those interested in Theravāda Buddhism, early Buddhism, South Asian Buddhism, or the relation of these traditions to other Buddhist traditions. In addition, Pali has recently garnered attention from psychologists and others interested in mindfulness meditation.

The Pali canon has a rich variety of genres, including evocative poems, philosophical and ethical discussions, and vivid and sometimes very humorous stories.

This intensive course in Pali is the equivalent of an academic year’s worth of language classes. It covers all the grammar and many of the language patterns found in Pali canonical prose and verse. It allows students to read basic materials from the Pali canon independently, and prepares them to enroll in the Intermediate Pali class at HDS.

The course is geared toward getting students to read Pali texts as quickly as possible, using materials chosen from key canonical texts. Students thus engage with key canonical materials from the first class.

Required books

  • Gair, James W. and W. S. Karunatillake. A New Course in Reading Pali: Entering the Word of the Buddha. Delhi: Motilal Banarsidass, 2013.
    ISBN-10:812081441X
    ISBN-13: 978-8120814417
  • Collins, Steven. A Pali Grammar for Students. Chiang Mai: Silkworm Books, 2006.
    ISBN-10: 9749511131
    ISBN-13: 978-9749511138

Recommended dictionary:

  • Rhys Davids, T.W. and William Stede. Pāli-English Dictionary. Oxford: The Pali Text Society Ltd., 1921–25, reprinted 1992,1995, repr. with corrections 2015.
    ISBN:0-86013-2–503-9

French for Reading in Theological and Religious Studies 

Instructor: Pascale Torracinta
Schedule: Monday 4–7 pm | Wednesday 4–7 pm | Thursday 4–7 pm
Room Assignment: Online
Teaching Fellow: Tali Zechory (email)

An intensive eight-week introduction to reading and translating modern French texts for students who require knowledge of French for research purposes. It presents the principle structures of French grammar in a systematic and coherent manner and, at the same time, gives reading and translation assignments in selected texts related to theological and religious studies.

Required books

  • Sandberg, Karl C. and Eddison C. TathamFrench for Reading.Prentice Hall, 1997.
  • 501 French Verbs by Christopher Kendris, Barron's Educational Series, 2007. You can purchase any previous edition of this book, or any other French verb book.
  • A good-sized, hardcover French-English/English-French dictionary, with a minimum of 150,000–300,000 entries (the more, the better). With more than 820,000 entries, the Collins Robert French Unabridged Dictionary (Collins Reference, 2012, 9th edition) is the best dictionary for scholarly work. Earlier editions of this dictionary (8th, 7th, etc.) are fine too and usually cheaper. Although less comprehensive, the Collins Robert French College Dictionary (350,000 entries) is another good choice. Please note that you cannot use an online dictionary during exams.

German for Reading in Theological and Religious Studies 

Instructor: Karin Grundler-Whitacre
Schedule: Monday 4–7 pm | Wednesday 4–7 pm | Thursday 4–7 pm
Room Assignment: Online
Teaching Fellow: Morgan Curtis (email)

This eight-week course in German translation balances the survey and instruction of German grammar, syntax, and basic vocabulary with the translation practice of texts by or about major German theologians and philosophers (Barth, Bonhoeffer, Hildegard von Bingen, Kant, Luther, Rahner, Schleiermacher, Soelle, and Tillich—to name just a few), as well as authors on religious matters, or texts describing world religions in general. We will work intensively on translation, reading, and analytical skills during the duration of the course. There will be approximately five to six weeks of grammar and syntax instruction and translation practice (with weekly vocabulary and translation quizzes), and the last two weeks of the course will focus on reviewing and practicing the newly acquired translation and reading skills. 

We are also hoping to have a course meeting through Andover-Harvard Theological Library to look at original texts in Fraktur-Script and to learn how to read and translate those documents. This is still unclear at this point, but we are very hopeful to create something that is very similar to the real-life experience.

Required books (We are working with the Andover-Harvard Theological Library to provide the textbook online and will provide an update as soon as possible):

  • Korb, Richard Alan. German for Reading Knowledge. 7th ed. Boston, MA: Heinle Cengage Learning, 2014.
    ISBN-10: 1-133-60426-9
    ISBN-13: 978-1-133-60426-6

The latest edition of this book is required! Please do not purchase previous copies, as they won't be useful in class. For more information about the book (print and digital version), see the publisher's website.

  • A dictionary: You will need a good-sized, hardcover German-English/English-German dictionary. A hardcover dictionary with at least 300,000 entries (more is always better) is required. Some of the most commonly used are: Harper Collins, Langenscheidt, Oxford-Duden, PONS, Webster's. You are welcome to use any dictionary of your choice. In the past students preferred Duden, Langenscheidt, or Harper-Collins dictionaries, and mentioned problems with the Cassells dictionary–therefore, I no longer recommend it.
  • Due to the changed circumstances, feel free to use an e-dictionary, or an online dictionary like http://www.leo.org.

Please note that you cannot use an online dictionary for work in class and during exams. The dictionary has to be a hardcopy and not a small paperback dictionary (too many words are missing from those).

Recommended books (it is not necessary to purchase these books; they are available on reserve in the library):

  • Coles, Waltraud and Bill Dodd. Reading German. A Course Book and Reference Grammar. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1997.
    ISBN-10: 0198700202
    ISBN-13: 978-0198700203
  • Wilson, April. German Quickly. A Grammar for Reading German. New York: Peter Lang Publishers, 2004.
    ISBN-10: 0820467596
    ISBN-13: 978-0820467597
  • Ziefle, Helmut W. Modern Theological German: A Reader and Dictionary. Rev. ed. Grand Rapids, MI: Baker
    Academic, 1997.
    ISBN-10: 0801021448
    ISBN-13: 978-0801021442
  • Zorach, Cecila Zorach and Charlotte Melin. English Grammar for Students of German. 4th ed. Ann Arbor, MI: Olivia & Hill Press, 2001.
    ISBN-10: 0934034311
    ISBN-13: 978-0934034319

Intermediate New Testament and Hellenistic Greek 

Instructor: Judy Haley
Schedule: Monday 4–7 pm | Wednesday 4–7 pm | Thursday 4–7 pm
Room Assignment: Online
Teaching Fellow: Sarah Griffis (email)

Now that you have done the hard work of learning the alphabet and endings take the next step towards reading any part of the Greek Bible--Septuagint or New Testament--for academic or pastoral work. You will also learn how to approach classical authors like Plato, Hellenistic Jewish writers like Philo and Josephus or early Christian authors like Justin Martyr. You will have a chance to review as well as study the structure of Greek sentences for greater fluency and insight.

Required books:

  • Hansen, Hardy, and Gerald Quinn. Greek. An Intensive Course. 2nd rev. ed. New York: Fordham University Press, 1992.
    ISBN-10: 0823216632
    ISBN-13: 978-0823216635
  • Metzger, Bruce. Lexical Aids for Students of New Testament Greek. 3rd ed. Grand Rapids: Baker Academic. 1998.
    ISBN-10: 0801021804
    ISBN-13: 978-0801021800

At least one Greek New Testament (such as):

  • Aland, Kurt, and Eberhard Nestle. Novum Testamentum Graece. With Dictionary 27th ed. Stuttgart: Deutsche Bibelgesellschaft, 2005.
    ISBN-10: 159856174X
    ISBN-13: 978-1598561746
  • Aland, Kurt, et. al. eds. The Greek New Testament. With Dictionary 4th rev. ed. New York: American Bible Society, 1998.
    ISBN-10: 3438051133
    ISBN-13: 978-3438051134
  • Aland, Kurt and Eberhard Nestle. Novum Testamentum Graece. 27th ed. New York: American Bible Society, 1993.
    ISBN-10: 34380510001
    ISBN-13: 9783438051004

Recommended lexicon:

  • Bauer, Walter. Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament and Other Early Christian Literature. Revised and edited by Frederick William Danker. 3rd ed. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 2000.
    ISBN-10: 0226039331
    ISBN-13: 978-0226039336
  • Liddell, H. G., and R. Scott. An Intermediate Greek-English Lexicon. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    ISBN-10: 0199102066
    ISBN-13: 9780199102068

Intermediate Biblical Hebrew 

InstructorJonathan Mason-Wolfe
Schedule: Monday 4–7 pm | Wednesday 4–7 pm | Thursday 4–7 pm
Room Assignment: Online
Teaching Fellow: Allison Hurst (email)

This intensive class is equivalent to the one-year course in Intermediate Biblical Hebrew at Harvard Divinity School. The focus of the class will be on the reading, translation, and interpretation of extensive passages of biblical Hebrew prose and poetry in order to facilitate increased fluency in the language and familiarity with the thought-world of the Hebrew Bible. In addition to the reading and translation of biblical texts, cumulative vocabulary building, and study of the Tiberian Masoretic tradition presented in Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia (and Quinta, where available), students will select from a series of other assignments so as to tailor the course to their specific learning requirements and/or vocational goals.

Required books:

  • Elliger, K., and W. Rudolph, ed. Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia. Stuttgart: Deutsche Bibelgesellschaft, 1997
    ISBN: 978-1598561630—though any (physical) edition of BHS is fine
  • Brown, F., S. Driver, and C. Briggs. Brown-Driver-Briggs Hebrew and English Lexicon. Peabody, MA: Hendrickson, 1996
    ISBN: 978-1565632066
  • Landes, George M. Building your Biblical Hebrew Vocabulary: Learning Words by Frequency and Cognate. SBL Press, 2011
    ISBN: 978-1589830035
  • Scott, William. A Simplified Guide to BHS (4th ed.). BIBAL Press, 2007
    ISBN: 978-0941037358

Recommended and on reserve at the Andover-Harvard Theological Library for the course:

  • Joüon, P. and Muraoka, T. A Grammar of Biblical Hebrew. 2nd Edition; Gregorian and Biblical Press, 2011
    ISBN: 978-8876536298
  • Lambdin, Thomas O. Introduction to Biblical Hebrew. London: Darton, Longman, and Todd, 1973
    ISBN: 978-0232513691
  • Berlin, Adele. The Dynamics of Biblical Parallelism. Indiana University Press, 1992
    ISBN: 978-0253207654
  • Würthwein, Ernst. The Text of the Old Testament: An Introduction to the Biblia Hebraica. 3rd Edition; Eerdman's, 2014
    ISBN: 978-0802866806

Spanish Reading in Theological and Religious Studies 

Instructor: Eileen Mary O'Connor
Schedule: Monday 4–7 pm | Wednesday 4–7 pm | Thursday 4–7 pm
Room Assignment: Online
Teaching Fellow: Lana Jaffe Neufeld (email)

This eight-week course introduces students to elementary and intermediate levels of Spanish grammar, syntax, and vocabulary and to the translation of texts related to theology and the study of religions. The course presupposes no previous knowledge of Spanish but progresses rapidly and includes weekly grammar and translation quizzes. Students will read and translate texts from a variety of religious traditions of the Spanish-speaking world: Sephardic and Sufi literature of El Andalus; poetry by mystics of the Counter-Reformation; the Maya creation myth; Mapuche (native Chilean) songs of praise; and essays about the mission of Pentecostalism in Latin America, Catholic liberation theology, and the traditions of Santería by practitioners of those faiths. Students will also read and translate literary and philosophical texts, including the work of Miguel Ángel Asturias, Rigoberta Menchú, Miguel de Unamuno and local poet Juana Rosa Pita.

Required book:

  • Spanish for Reading and Translation, by Cash and Murray.

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SLP Library Resources

Andover-Harvard Theological Library has a dedicated online area for SLP students.